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New Year Resolutions for Students

Why do it now when I can do it later?!The Procrastinator gives off a very care-free vibe; while everyone also is rushing around to get papers done early, the procrastinator is taking a nap on the second floor of the library. However, as midterms arrive, the Procrastinator miraculously morphs into the cramster/anxiety struck student (and his final grades reflect this all-too-familiar identity

Why do it now when I can do it later?!A new year offers everyone, including college students, a clean slate and a chance to reflect between semesters. Close to seventy percent of people make resolutions at the start of the year, but only ten percent actually make it past mid-January. However, college students are not a homogeneous group; we’re all different, and our resolutions reflect this. Below are five different resolutions for five different types of students. If 2009 wasn’t a stellar academic year for you, who says 2010 can’t be?

The Procrastinator: For as long as this student can remember, the motto has been, “If I can do it tomorrow, why do it today?” The Procrastinator gives off a very care-free vibe; while everyone also is rushing around to get papers done early, the procrastinator is taking a nap on the second floor of the library. However, as midterms arrive, the Procrastinator miraculously morphs into the cramster/anxiety struck student (and his final grades reflect this all-too-familiar identity). In 2010, things will be different for this student. He will keep a planner and start assignments early. Most importantly, the Procrastinator will finally become fluent in time management and avoiding the lazy lure. If you happen to be a habitual Procrastinator, we recommend taking a look at the Avoiding Procrastination Study Guide.

The Drifter: Although it’s easy to mix them up, the Drifter and the Procrastinator is not the same person. The Procrastinator makes every effort to attend class. The Drifter, however, only attends class if and when the spirit moves him. He usually shows up on the first and last day of class, but even then, she doesn’t excel at taking notes and usually zones out within 10 minutes. In 2010, the Drifter will attempt to attend class more often because: a) he finally realize he is hindering his academic success by skipping, b) her parents are tired of paying thousands of dollars only to have her skip class, or c) he were placed on academic warning by their college. Some professors may seem to not care if you skip, but most often, they write students who skip off as uncommitted, and when the time comes for recommendation letters, they are much less inclined to give you a favorable comment. The Drifter also realizes that one day he will have a job, and that job requires them to be there on time every day. The drifter should also note: there is nothing revolutionary about skipping class.

The Challenger: The Challenger is willing to challenge any and every thing in the class. The class is too big, the assigned readings are too long, the paper is too challenging to write in just three weeks – you name it, and she’s probably complained about it. This particular student also has an intellectual field day at the slightest mistake a professor makes. The Challenger also will argue zealously over that half point he lost on the exam. In 2009, the Challenger would lose it if another student received a higher grade than him and had no problem letting the professor really hear it about everything from the syllabus to the classroom lighting. In 2010, the Challenger’s only resolution should be to worry about debating and challenging his own academic performance.

The Slacker: We’ve all been the Slacker at one point or another. After all, it’s pretty tempting to cut corners in college. In 2009, we took that six page paper and turned in a three page essay. The assigned readings? We only did those if we were sure beyond a reasonable doubt that the material would show up on the exam. In 2010, the Slackers and Corner Cutters are going to stop toying with the margins to make their essays seem longer, actually do the homework, and not bet on the professor forgetting to collect it.

The Stressed-Out Overachiever: A prominent figure in most classrooms, this student takes 21 credits a semester and works two part-time jobs. If he looks sleep deprived, it’s probably because he is. In 2010, the Overachiever should still, well, overachieve if she wishes, but it behooves her to remove the stress from her academic curriculum. Instead of focusing on their grades like a laser beam, these students should try to enjoy their college experience. Sometimes, students can subconsciously place themselves in this category; however, if 15 credits sounds like heaven on Earth for you, chances are we have a Stressed-out Overachiever on our hands. In 2010, the Overachiever will take fewer classes, stop adding more majors and minors, and dare I say, enjoy the little things in life.

About Huda Jawad

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2 comments

  1. LOOL. This article was a classic! Well done to Huda Jawad…I’m glad the crtiics on her other articles didn’t scare her from telling it like it is!

    I’m most likely the drifter…better work on it this semester!

  2. 😡 😳 😥 😮 😕 :sigh:

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