Hijabi? Putting Pictures on Facebook?

Hijabi? Putting Pictures on Facebook?

Sure, we all want to show our friends how drop dead gorgeous we were looking at some party we went to. We also want to prove to our non-Hijabi friends how we resemble those supermodels on TV when we dress up for the “Halal prom”. We also want to amaze our non-Muslim female friends with the awesome hairstyles and colors under our Hijab.

Ever seen a Hijabi posting her most beautiful pictures on Facebook? I have. And it’s completely beyond my understanding. Before everyone concludes I’m an extremist of some sort, I’ll admit that I’m on Facebook too, and at some point, I have also posted my pictures up. But that’s when I discovered that several months of Facebook usage still does not empower most of us with the ability to conquer the privacy settings on our profiles, if they were ever of any use to start with.

Sure, we all want to show our friends how drop dead gorgeous we were looking at some party we went to. We also want to prove to our non-Hijabi friends how we resemble those supermodels on TV when we dress up for the “Halal prom”. We also want to amaze our non-Muslim female friends with the awesome hairstyles and colors under our Hijab. In all honesty, we just want to have some fun and share our exciting Kodak moments with our friends, right?

I once spoke to a fellow Hijabi about posting pictures of herself without Hijab on Facebook, MSN, and other online social networking services. She said, “I know that there will always be the possibility of non-mahrams seeing my pictures while my friends are looking at them, but it’s their responsibility to take care of my Hijab, I trust them. I guess I’m just one of those girls who don’t like thinking outside the box.”

Pure intentions aside, since when has there been the Islamic exception of trusting others with our Hijab? And what does thinking outside the box have to do with anything? If others were trustworthy enough to take care of our Hijab, then I’d never have come across those online photos of posing Hijabis featuring the religious leader’s wife without Hijab in the background.

Fortunately, 50 percent of Hijabis are wise enough to avoid posting non-Hijabi pictures on such public websites. But the number of Hijabis who make their profile pictures (which can usually be accessed by the entire Facebook network) a picture of themselves is simply overwhelming. Of course, it is technically “permissible” for non-mahrams to see us while we are in Hijab, but the majority of Hijabis are so dolled up in their display pictures that it seems as though someone forced a headscarf on the winner of America’s Next Top Model.

Of course, sisters are not alone when it comes to the competition of who looks the hottest in their Facebook display picture. The brothers have been quick to catch on. Posing with their Versace sunglasses and slick t-shirts (if they are wearing one at all), down to the core of the matter, it has become a game of impressing anyone and everyone, as long as you’re on Facebook.

But the photo album disease is also spreading far and wide with the adults too! The number of parents who are posting pictures of their children is absolutely terrifying. It’s understandable that parents want to show off their beautiful children to their friends; however, it goes without saying that many of these parents are not exactly quite tech-savvy and not too proficient when it comes to privacy settings, thereby often leaving their children’s pictures publicly accessible by any and all weirdos.

Furthermore, according to a report by the BBC, a team of researchers from Cambridge University analyzed sixteen social networking websites and discovered that some sites, including Facebook, stored photos of users and allowed them to be viewed by others, even after the user deleted them. They did this by uploading pictures and noting down the image URLs. “When checked 30 days later, these links continued to work for seven of the sites, even though a typical user might think the photos had been removed,” the researchers found. Despite all the privacy settings and limitations we may try and implement to our Facebook and other online profiles, more likely than not there will always be a loophole in the system, a fact that many of us are quite oblivious to.

Another classic example of privacy settings gone wrong is adding an application or taking certain quizzes on Facebook, which give the creator access to our entire profile, including all our private photos and the “public link” on our albums, which gives anyone who has this link complete access to all our “hidden” pictures.

While there are multiple benefits of having pictures on Facebook, including “so my friends know it’s me who is adding them” and “my relatives overseas want to see what I look like”, it’s quite a risky business. Accessible from Google, the entire process of having our pictures downloaded and saved on someone’s computer takes only a few seconds. It is very possible that a Hijabi sister’s cute profile picture of her having a good time with friends might very well end up in the hands of an overzealous matchmaker in the community and ogled over by dozens of boys around the globe, and vice versa.

The essence of Hijab is simple: to conceal as much as possible and only display our beauty when absolutely necessary. If Facebook profile pictures were an absolutely necessary place for Muslims girls, boys, and adults to post their most stunning and attractive pictures for the whole world to see, then I guess I’ve been slow to jump on the bandwagon.

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Huda Jawad

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  1. otowi
    June 29, 10:48
    I didn't understand until the third paragraph that this article was talking specifically about pictures posted in which the girl is not wearing hijab. Is that what it is about, or about any pictures, including ones with proper hijab?
  2. SM
    June 29, 16:47
    [quote]The essence of Hijab is simple: to conceal as much as possible and only display our beauty when absolutely necessary. If Facebook profile pictures were an absolutely necessary place for Muslims girls, boys, and adults to post their most stunning and attractive pictures for the whole world to see, then I guess I've been slow to jump on the bandwagon.[/quote]<br /><br />I think she means both. :-) <br /><br />Jazak'Allah for the excellent article, sister! Very well-written and to the point. May Allah (swt) reward you immensely for your efforts! :D :D :D
  3. ?
    June 29, 17:12
    Is "concealing as much as possible" really the essence of hijab? If so, why aren't all Shia women observing purdah and burqah? And if someone is wearing [i]truly [/i] proper hijab, then how are they displaying their beauty by sharing a few photos of, say, a community lecture series or madressa awards ceremony on Facebook? Are all photos the problem, or perhaps is it that girls and boys should be careful about what photos to post, if any, in regard to intention, security, privacy, hijab, and dignity?
  4. "And if someone is wearing truly proper hijab, then how are they displaying their beauty by sharing a few photos of, say, a community lecture series or madressa awards ceremony on Facebook?"<br /><br />I agree.<br /><br /> I do believe that the author makes a point in writing about 'facebook hijab' and she does make an effort to say that she is generalizing, but I find her viewpoint a little cynical. But I am on the naive side. Yes, I've seen sisters who wear hijab display profile pictures that look like America's next Top Model, but I've also seen those who just have a 'normal' picture with friends or family. Sometimes, not every picture is about showing off one's beauty to the world, it is just a simple picture, so that friends see their friend's face. I think in our over analyzation of everything these days, nothing remains simple. A 'beautiful picture' for some people is not a means of showing off, it is just how they look, the real 'them' (I am not speaking of the modeled up make up here) and to display their profile pictures to their friends and family is the same as meeting them in public--at work, school, a masjid or wherever else. <br /><br />That said, there is a problem with facebook users not being aware of how many of their pictures/albums are accessible to others. Hopefully, both sisters and brothers will become more savvy in the nature and tools of facebook use.
    • umma
      March 06, 04:10
      Totally agree with sis Fatima! :roll: <br /><br /><br /><br />[quote name="sister Fatima"]"And if someone is wearing truly proper hijab, then how are they displaying their beauty by sharing a few photos of, say, a community lecture series or madressa awards ceremony on Facebook?"<br /><br />I agree.<br /><br /> I do believe that the author makes a point in writing about 'facebook hijab' and she does make an effort to say that she is generalizing, but I find her viewpoint a little cynical. But I am on the naive side. Yes, I've seen sisters who wear hijab display profile pictures that look like America's next Top Model, but I've also seen those who just have a 'normal' picture with friends or family. Sometimes, not every picture is about showing off one's beauty to the world, it is just a simple picture, so that friends see their friend's face. I think in our over analyzation of everything these days, nothing remains simple. A 'beautiful picture' for some people is not a means of showing off, it is just how they look, the real 'them' (I am not speaking of the modeled up make up here) and to display their profile pictures to their friends and family is the same as meeting them in public--at work, school, a masjid or wherever else. <br /><br />That said, there is a problem with facebook users not being aware of how many of their pictures/albums are accessible to others. Hopefully, both sisters and brothers will become more savvy in the nature and tools of facebook use.[/quote]
  5. Noor M
    June 30, 14:09
    Good Article but one should worry about themselves. If your doing the right thing, then let the others be.. I look at Facebook as "stalking made easy". If your posting your pictures on the internet (whether it be guy or girl, dressed or undressed), you better be expecting many people to view them.
  6. Anonymous
    June 30, 15:28
    Assallamu alaikum,<br /><br />Well written sister. May Allah (swt) reward you for the efforts. <br /><br />[quote]written by Noor M , June 30, 2009<br />[b]Good Article but one should worry about themselves[/b]. If your doing the right thing, then let the others be.. I look at Facebook as "stalking made easy". If your posting your pictures on the internet (whether it be guy or girl, dressed or undressed), you better be expecting many people to view them. [/quote]<br /><br />Amr Bil Maroof and Nahi Anil Munkar - Enjoining the good and forbidding the evil. That's what the sister is doing. We shouldn't have this kind of mentalitiy, we should point out others faults whilst looking at our own faults, at the same time. <br /><br />Majooreen,<br /><br />Wassallamu Alaikum,
  7. Batool Jafri
    June 30, 18:33
    Salaam,<br />This is a good article that needs to be circulated amongst many of our communities. Posting up inappropriate pictures on facebook and online in general is very common these days, especially amongst our Hijabi sisters (I'm leaving out the brothers because they're just a whole other story :-x). I agree, I think the sis is doing her duty of Amr Bil Maroof & Nahi Anil Munkar for the sisters. May Allah reward you for your efforts.
  8. HIJABlover
    June 30, 23:43
    im glad this issue was raised, i always get confused whether it be ok to post pictures of yourself so freely on the net, even with hijab on. (im very shokd to hear that some sister actually post without!?) a few years ago it was seen by many, including myself as very wrong to post photos on the net, but now that everyone is doing it has become a sort of 'norm'. and so i do actually post photos of myself, but not when im in my best pose or wearing my best outfit. i always think to myself what is the purpose of my hijab? isnt it so that i do not show off my beauty. i find it inappropriate when the camera is aimed just at yourself looking at ur absolute best, as like it was mentioned before, u dont know who can be looking on. <br /><br />thanks sister! great article!
  9. ~55
    July 01, 02:12
    The amount of comments made on this page should be enough to prove that this is a hot topic and one that needs more discussion and research... god bless you all...
  10. [quote]I think in our over analyzation of everything these days, nothing remains simple.[/quote]<br /><br />I think most Islamic laws are under analyzed these days. We always try to find the easy way out and live off what is “permissible” rather than what is more Islamically appropriate or highly recommended. It doesn’t make a difference if you’re posting pictures of Madressa awards night or the girls night out, the point is that you’re unnecessarily displaying yourself, and this is VERY different to having people see us in public because that is not voluntary but rather, a necessity. And that is why it's permissible.
  11. khadija
    July 01, 20:07
    I think its high time someone brought this subject up..and the reasons for Hijabi's putting their pics on facebook are very lame..i dont buy that..its very unfortunate that our own shia even momin brothers and sisters think otherwise when it comes to posting your pictures on social networking sites.<br />I find it very uncomfortable if a complete stranger might be looking at my personal pics..i think at the end of the day we really have to ask ourselves what out true intention really is for posting our very attarctive pics or any pics for that matter on these sites..and you will find ur answer..otherwise ur just fooling yourself!!<br />Get real people!!wake up..dont let shaitan fool you...what would Bibi Fatima (A.s)say ??please ponder on this and inshaAllah the right guidence from our Masoomeen(A.s) will come
  12. masooma
    July 01, 23:50
    asalaam alaaykum wr wb<br /><br />In reference to some comments: I think being careful about pictures and thinking about this is wise.<br /><br />But be careful, please, about going so far as making judgments on halal/haram without checking on rulings from your marjah or asking your resident scholar, etc. <br /><br />Publicly displayed pictures of women in hijab are not new since Facebook came along; the camera has been around awhile now. You can find websites,newspapers, magazines, galleries and so on published by Islamic scholars or their representatives, mosques, masjids, etc., that all contain pictures of hijabi women at various Islamic, community, educational and other functions. Their faces are typically not blotted out, they are sometimes identified, they are not controlling who sees them, preventing them from being seen, or saying that no image of a hijabi woman should ever be seen in public or online. Ayatollah Sistani in Contemporary Rulings of the West is quoted saying that a film developer can see and develop photos of hijabi women even without hijab provided they are not pornography and he doesn't know the women. There are numerous rulings about passport/ID photos being permissible, and others in various publications of rulings from various scholars about the permissibility of photos in general, including involving hijabi women, including published photos that might be seen by anyone. I won't post them all, but anyone can conduct the searches or submit queries to the appropriate people. But, several of them apparently allow women's photos to be seen in public, generally speaking, and of course involving all appropriate hijab rules.<br /><br />That doesn't mean there is no need for concern over posting any and everything on Facebook, nor that a hijabi does not have the prerogative to avoid posting pictures on her profile if she thinks that is best. Young sisters and brothers are sometimes naive and do not think about what they are posting or portraying.
  13. Anie
    July 02, 00:05
    Great job!<br />Makes me reconsider putting up pics, i am always scared of the security around pictures. <br />Thanx for the article, May Allah bless you.
  14. kawthar
    July 02, 04:53
    i am really glad for your splendid writing as a muslim girl and a hijibi too. i like talking about these subjects in the net for there will be people who read it and add coments and most probably think about it.but i like to add this fact that how much it is needed to post a picture of our uncovered hair when it is not really necessary. it is really fun to join different communities but we can do it with all our limitations that we would certaily consider. and as i have been a memeber too i remember the fact that you may add as many people as u like in your friends so there might be many whom never know that much but you add them so they might see you as well as all people that open your profile correct me if i am wrong.<br />so tell me the necessity for thus article then and post me your email too<br />thanks
  15. The Author
    July 02, 08:06
    Walaikum Salam<br />Thank you for all the comments. ;-)<br /><br />Sister Masooma, surely it is “permissible” to have one’s pictures viewed by non-mahrams as long as they are observing proper hijab. However, the central issue that we need to ponder upon is whether or not we are achieving anything by having our faces displayed in public to an unlimited amount of non-mahram viewers. When hijabis are featured in the media, if there is a beneficial purpose to having them being displayed that way, for example, a news report of a Muslim girls school which raised money for a charity, then it seems more appropriate for hijabis to be seen by mass numbers as it serves a very good purpose. In fact, both brothers and sisters should be encouraged to utilize most forms of media in order to improve Islam’s image and to encourage others to do good. <br /><br />On the other hand, one must be careful to avoid being overly enthusiastic about such “pure” intentions as dolled up hijabis on Facebook may just use this as an excuse to “encourage non-hijabis to do hijab” or “encouraging Muslim boys to marry hijabi girls because we can be just as pretty, if not prettier than the non-hijabi girls” (just for the record, I’ve heard both these excuses)...obviously this will do them more harm than good. It’s also very important to consider how many people we will be “positively influencing” by posting pictures online. Let’s take pictures from the Madressa awards ceremony as an example. We may intend to help encourage others to attend Madressa. But, how many Madressa aged children that don’t attend Madressa would have access to such an album? It really comes down to one’s own judgement but let’s be honest to ourselves, just because something is permissible it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a fantastic idea. For example, it is permissible to delay our prayers right until the ending time. Yet, by every minute we delay our prayers we are only reducing the amount of rewards we are able to reap. I guess it comes down to how important accumulating as many rewards as possible is to every hijabi sister out there. :-)
  16. masooma
    July 02, 09:34
    Sister, don't get me wrong, for I have not disagreed with the majority of what you have said. My comment was about halal/haram.<br />Maybe some people deceive themselves about their intentions, and I have not at all disagreed about some people posting inappropriate pics, questionable hijab, no hijab, etc., - but some of the legitimate reasons you mentioned might very well be served via Facebook, and for example, I don't see it as a bad thing that children not attending madressa might see pictures from madressa - that could even be dawah, and depending on the images and context, of no harm to anyone in the photos, and not necessarily more meritorious to keep the picture from being seen.<br /><br />I think your message of think twice is valid and well received. But personally I wouldn't go so far as to say no hijabi pics should be on Facebook or other social networking sites ever, nor that they are haram, as I mentioned before. I don't think the prayer on time analogy completely fits here, because there are many factors involved that make the underlying assumptions worth more reflection. However, I am not promoting use of photos on these sites nor discouraging anyone from being photo-free.<br /><br />However, I might suggest that if people have such concerns about security and use of images, etc., they should question if they should be on Facebook or MySpace or other such sites at all. There are many people, particularly unmonitored youth, who are not able to properly distinguish or control themselves about how to use such sites within the realm of permissibility and for good purposes. Other people are able to use them properly and for good purpose, because they are monitored by their families carefully, or they are mature adults secure in the deen, or other factors. Any person should question why are they subscribed to and using such a service and evaluate what they get from it and the spiritual effects.
  17. Very nice article...worth a few ponderings..<br /><br />I'd just like to say that, from what I have seen, more and more people today do not like to be told what to do and what not, even if it is from an Islamic perspective...<br /><br />Others who might listen, show yo-yo like behaviour...they might follow through for a certain period, and then revert...n then, maybe follow through again :D .... n i think this happens because of people around them.. people posting pictures of every little thing that, as rightly mentioned by some1 above, posting pictures becomes a 'no big deal'... <br /><br />speaking of norms, everyone wants to be part of something since it is accepted ... i'd left facebook and was off for it a good 8-9 months before i joined again once uni was over because i realized i was so out of the loop...i guess this is what new media does...n now guess what? :-) i'm beginning to consider leaving it again, bcoz im thinking what exactly it was that i felt so left out of...<br /><br />back to the photos, i think that it depends on the intention of the person. Just like it is with hijab - there are females who cover completely but still have no hijab in the eyes, and there are those who do not cover as much but still guard themselves.. lol, speaking of overzealous matchmakers, really, would knowing this fact matter to that girl who's picture is being rotated around? i think not. This is something that girls are already aware of and it won't really make them change their decision about posting pictures....maybe few might consider it, but not many in my opinion..we've all also heard of several warnings wherein pictures may fall into the wrong hands..but again, we tend to be highly optimistic and think, O that won't happen to me im sure...<br /><br />also, i don't knw how relevant 'concealing as much as possible' is to hijab (i'm assuming by that the writer also intended intentional loud behaviour and other such aspects) , but i'd like to reiterate, niyyah is highly important as well...<br /><br />thanks, and once again, very thought-provoking..
  18. AMR
    July 02, 12:27
    Assalam Alaikum Sister<br /><br />I absolutely agree with you that there are some situations where it is necessary to have pictures of Hijabis. One example as you suggested is on a passport or on a driver's license. Similarly, as Sis. Zehrah pointed out in her comment, there are other situations where it might be beneficial to have such pictures, for example, when it comes to the positive portrayal of Islam in the media, etc.<br /><br />The point that the author is making, as per my understanding, is that 9 out of 10 times, [b]posting pictures on Facebook is neither "necessary" not "beneficial" in any way, nor is it done with that "intention", and hence, it should be avoided[/b]. Granted, it is permissible if proper Hijab is observed, and you are quite correct in the jurisprudential points you raised, but the article is not supposed to be about the Halal/Haram aspect of it at all, and I don't see the author (or most of the commenters) saying anything about it being Haram.<br /><br />In Islam, we have both the Fiqhi (jurisprudential) as well as the Akhlaqi (ethical/spiritual) side to all issues. According to the former, posting pictures might be fine, but according to the latter, it is certainly [b]not a good idea[/b]. In other words, a Marja will say that it is definitely permissible to post Hijab-appropriate pictures on Facebook, but the question is: if his own daughter wanted to post her Hijabi pictures online, would he be ok with that? :D<br /><br />As the author states, the purpose of Hijab is to conceal as much as possible and only reveal what is necessary. Indeed, when the Prophet [saww] asked his companions, "What is the best thing for a woman?", and Imam Ali [as] posed this question to Lady Fatima [as], she replied, "It is best for a woman that a man doesn't see her and that she doesn't see a man." :-)<br /><br />Furthermore, narrations tell us that when Imam Ali, Hasan, and Hussain [as] returned from the burial of Lady Fatima, Lady Zainab told her father that she wanted to go visit her mother's grave. Since it was almost time for Fajr prayers, and there would be non-mahrams walking around in the streets, Imam Ali told Lady Zainab to wait till later that night, when there would be no men present in the streets. When it came time for Isha, Imam Ali told her they would wait until midnight, when they could be 100% certain that streets were completely deserted. Finally at midnight, Imam Ali took Lady Zainab to visit her mother's grave, but only such that Imam Hasan walked in front of her, Imam Ali on the side, and Imam Hussain behind her. When they arrived, Lady Zainab wanted to drop herself on her mother's grave, but Imam Ali held her back and asked Imam Hasan to extinguish the lamp near the grave, in case a wandering traveler might walk by and see Lady Zainab's figure. Only after the lamp was extinguished was Lady Zainab allowed to pay her respects to her mother. <br /><br />This is how much precaution Imam Ali observed when it came to the issue of Hijab, even though his daughter was barely five years old at the time and was fully clad in black from head to toe...
  19. sister
    July 02, 14:52
    Alhamdulillah for all the sisters that are aware of this. Let's not get carried away with all these pictures being posted. I was asked why i never have one of these social networking things and i simply replied because of the pictures. (which still confused people...). I notice that people who do have one of these myspace, facebook, etc. are obsessed to take pictures all the time, so the whole world could see. (i guess that's why I hate taking pictures.) it's not coool. seriously.
  20. Magic Hijabi
    July 03, 03:51
    I don't understand this over emphasis on intention when actions themselves speak pretty loud also. Most Sisters have brothers added as friends on fb, and a good number of brothers also comment on their pictures when posted. "You look great", "nice outfit" and slowly the mental Hijab is eroded. There's a great amount of self gratification people can get off Facebook, the question remains at what cost though?<br /><br />Also, God forbid something happens to your fb account (it gets hacked etc) and some weirdo has your pics. Good luck getting help from Fb who relies on automated email systems :D.
  21. otowi
    July 03, 13:22
    [quote]Sisters have brothers added as friends on fb, and a good number of brothers also comment on their pictures when posted. "You look great", "nice outfit" and slowly the mental Hijab is eroded.[/quote]<br /><br />Sounds like a bigger problem to me - if they're posting photos that illicit such comments, why do they have male friends on fb, or why are they on fb at all? Maybe they shouldn't be.
  22. Same topic addressed on facebook in Women In Islam:'<br /><br />http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/topic.php?uid=31699041580&topic=8065
  23. Assalamu Alaikum,<br /><br />Another tentacle of this problem of posting personal information on facebook is not only that ANYONE, EVEN NON FB MEMBERS can see your profile pic and several profile pics of your friends just by googling your FB name, but the accessibility of your information and photos by the media.<br /><br />When our husbands were arrested in 2006 under a terrorism setup, the media combed the internet for information about us through social networking. They found several of our personal blogs, and they had links to other blogs. They found comments everywhere we typed on the internet by following the dots with our online or real names.<br /><br />The media had a field day with our comments. Alhamdulillah, we didn't have photos of ourselves, but some of the guys arrested had photos of themselves on their blogs or each other's blogs. That is where the media got their pics from.<br /><br />One newspaper had a reporter who just happened to be the brother of a girl I went to High School with and he printed my high school album photo in the local paper. I wasn't muslim then...<br /><br />They took our comments out of context to portray us as monsters. It turned the Muslim community against us when we needed their support the most. None of us used bad language or were backbiting anyone. We were always giving each other naseeha or making jokes, planning picnics or fundraisers and alot of the teenagers were posting about news events around the world that were of great concern and pain for them.<br /><br />Just take a minute and think about the media OF THE ENTIRE WORLD (my name could elicit almost 1 million hits 3 years ago, it still comes up over 5000 today and Wikipedia has a page about my husband). <br /><br />Just think about what the whole world would say about you if all of your networking sites were discovered and a REAL public profile of you were splashed across the newspapers, with your most controversial statements and your photos. Just google my name and read the vile gossip and hatred people spread about me.<br /><br />If you are going to be "out there" then at least use the internet responsibly. You never know when your name might be connected to a big media story.
  24. mohammed
    July 13, 22:21
    i am a journalist , my name is mohammed hasehm and broadcast on I.O.L RADIO. Please we are very interterested in this topic and the whole notio0n and essence behind facebook, and how its changing us.<br /><br /><br />Please comment or send me details to mohamed.hashem@mediaintl.net we need to hear your voice and talk about our opinions on radio. Th eprogram will part of islamonline.net and will be broadcast soon. Please be a part of our discussion.
  25. I really do respect this article and the person who wrote it, but I disagree in many of the points made. For instance, I have a FaceBook and I do have some pictures posted of me and my friends wearing the hijab and looking very modest. I mostly put the pictures up so most of my friends can see them, and for my personal like of them. I do agree with the fact that if a girl was not following the rules of hijab and acting inappropriate in most of the pictures, then they should be removed. If you have these pictures up only for fun, no harm to yourself or others, then you shouldn't worry about who will see them or use them. As long as a person has Eman and good intentions then they shouldn't have to worry about problems like this. If you have boys on your FaceBook, then that is a different situation. Even though they are most likely to see these pictures, you didn't mean for them to see them. I, personally do not like it when guys comment girls on their pictures, I find it inappropriate, but then again you can't escape anything when you are on FaceBook. You have to understand what you're getting yourself into before you even create a FaceBook. Posting personal information is also bad, because that is a way people can gain access to you, but as for the pictures, I do not think they are as harmful as you think they are. Unless if we are dealing with some sort of FaceBook war, then maybe.
  26. Ayesha Noor
    July 17, 11:07
    I personally thing that there is nothing wrong in posting Hijab pictures on the face book where the girl is dressed modestly. If anything it will encourage our other Muslim sisters who do not wear hijab. It will tell them that life with Hojab is as practical (if not more) as without Hijab. Non Hijan, make up pictures are a big NO.
  27. Qeybshaa
    August 18, 19:23
    Iam a facebook user who regulary post pictures on my profile. Reading this article has made me think twice about uploading my own pictures on the site . It is a great corncern to me that my images could easily be used by others for marketing tools or in worse situation by the media. Good article.
  28. 78666
    August 29, 21:29
    WOW!!!! this article shares the same thoughts as mine...i absolutely love this article an d you did a very good job with wording it. and it was quite comical at the same time! hahaa<br />best of all this article is very informational and very interesting for the upcoming generation. I mean i totally understand.<br />EXCELLENT JOB!
  29. saria sadaf
    January 17, 05:59
    i wud really appreciate sis 4 dis article...!!!....dis is wat we need sumthing in this contaminated world....!!!!....may allah....guide us..on the right path....!!!!...ameen...!!!!
  30. Asmara Agha
    April 12, 05:01
    I true appreciate this article . This article is an eye opener to all those whose lives now revolve around facebook. My advise to all those women is to think outside the box. If you take Hijab you better know that this virtual world is not safe. You should understand that you have to set your own boundries. Do'nt just follow everyone blindly.<br /><br />Be wise start thinking outside the box. Be ware of all those social media networking sites.
  31. thanks sister u have brought an important issue over here..since i have been on facebook i have tried to convince all of my friends about the same..and its not regarding a complete hijab or incomplete one..in my opinion what is the need of a female to put up pic with or without hijab on a such a social platform whereby we try to avoid public gazes in real life..isn't it a kind of hypocrisy that i m not able to see anyone viewing my pic so everything is ok when in a way i m jus tryin to compensate for the hidden anxiety due to putting up hijab in real life which i would say in that case is a burden on that person..why shud we be so starved for attention seeking..i m sorry but sincerely this is not the attire of muslim woman who knoz the meaning of puttin a HIJAB or even simply the meaning of her name..may allah guide us to the right path..
  32. umma
    March 06, 04:06
    dear ms. syed, another article on hijab. you make some good points of course. as an avid reader, may i suggest avoiding phrases such as "beyong my understanding," and "absolutely terrifying," because it sounds over the top. also stick to your message without making fun of others, even if they are anonymous. all the best...
    • Magic_Hijabi
      March 06, 16:56
      Making fun of others? Hmm, seems to be something you're better at than the author. Don't like an article on hijab, then don't read it. It's a free country.
    • rose
      May 20, 02:26
      umma, everyone has their own writing style. what seems "over the top" to you, may just be the author expressing exactly what she's feeling when she thinks of such issues. think about it please.
  33. ummm
    May 20, 03:43
    "it is technically "permissible" for non-mahrams to see us while we are in Hijab..."<br /><br />that's all that matters.<br />it's halal, it's allowed by god, and your qualms with it are just that, your own. you're allowed to express your opinion, but everyone should keep in mind that these people on fb are not doing anything wrong if they keep their awrah covered.
  34. Muslimaah
    August 22, 20:56
    Dislike. I feel the article is quite judgemental, close minded and bias. Why is there a need to bucket hijaabis? "Our" , "We"?<br />Does it matter if a picture is in the hands of a matchmaker? If the sister is single and there is a brother out there who is suited and also looking for marriage, what is the issue? Many marriages begin with the individuals seeing a picture and deciding whether to take the next step as there must be some form of attraction. Is there a need to alienate hijaabis and prevent them from posting any photos up on Facebook when they walk around outside at school, work, shopping etc with their faces showing and even appear on tv publicly where the world is free to take as many pictures and videos of them as they like?
    • Muslimaah
      August 22, 21:00
      *Re everything in the post - Of course, providing the girl is wearing hijaab in the pictures (if she is hijaabi)!
    • Re: Muslimaah
      September 30, 19:57
      Judgmental? Seeing the repeated use of this word these days should make one wonder - why is there such a fear of being judged if one is perfectly confident that there's absolutely nothing wrong with one's actions or if their actions will be a source of honor and pride to the Ahlulbayt (as). Hijabi or not, male or female, every person knows deep inside that if they're putting up a picture for the world to see they're seeking some form of admiration and approval from the crowd (for a hijabi girl it's definitely contradicting her goal of wearing the hijab i.e. to avoid unwanted attention towards herself). What other purpose does a picture serve when it is put up on a social networking site?
  35. sisterhaleemah
    September 30, 19:27
    As Salaamu Alaikum <br />This is a subject that I hold dear. Mostly because from my understand Hijab (PROPER HIJAB) is a a guard<br />Hijab, covering, proper hijab are the Operative words. <br /> when I see Sisters Dressed but not Dressed My thoughts go to one Implimenting Bidah. ex;<br />Hair showing be it up down or other wise. Tight pants, tight jeans, low neck lines, short sleeves. the list goes on and on.. Some smiling, posing in inticing manner, facial expression, neck and clevage showing etc. <br />Now ta subject that HASN'T been mentioned MUCH. Thier being made up .w/ ANYTHING that inhances one beauty<br />aren't some of, Alot of and or Most of these Actions MAKHROO AND OR HARAM <br /> I say in my Dua's FORGIVE THEM LORD FORE THEY KNOW NOT WHAT THEY DO.Because of a FEW things; I feel it is BIDAH and thier doing so is IMPLIMENTING BIDAH. It HAS CAUSES AND AFFECTS OUR YOUNG SISTERS about and against Wearing Hijab. EX; IF SHE, THEY, YOU, DON'T Dress according to Islam then WHY DO I HAVE TO, WHY SHOULD I HAVE TO? children get teased and taunted in school and other places which i caus them NOT to want to wear it causef thier being harassed .. They are SEEING THIS. then HAVING to SEE MUSLIMAHS, Family members and<br />riends SLOWLY BUT SURELY GETTING AWAY FROM WEARING HIJAB.<br />We ALL KNOW t WEARING HIJABDOESN'T make one MUSLIM, BUT WEARING HIJAB (PROPER HIJAB) IS A PART OF BEING MUSLIM. Our WEARING HIJAB PROPERLY<br />IS GIVING SUTTLE DAWAH.<br />BUT when WE come OUT OF IT FIIP FLOP BACK AND FORTH AND put on MAKE-UP HOW, CAN WE, EARNESTLY AND SINCERELYTELL SOMEONE ABOUT THE GOOD FROM BEING MODEST/PIOUS.<br />WE were told to COVER . WE were TOLD WHAT TO COVER, HOW MUCH TO COVER <br />ANY THING I MAY HAVE SAID THAT IS TRUE AND BENEFICIAL CAME FROM ALLAH SUBHANA WATA 'ALAA. <br />ANYTHING I SAID THAT IS FALSE CAME FROM MYSELF AND SHAITAN<br />Sister Haleemah
  36. sisterhaleemah
    September 30, 19:41
    Salaam Alaikum;<br />I had to cut alot of what I had said in trying to explain myself my feeling and my thoughts<br />All that I said came for material that I have Read, Heard in Lectures from Imams to Sheikhs<br />I have a GREAT NEED to APOLOGIZE for getting off the subject at hand IF that is what I did by generalizing it.<br />I find myself wondering how I will know if anyone responds to this.<br />How will I know?
  37. -MA-
    November 17, 00:37
    Do not upload any pics at all, let alone ones without hijab. This can potentially earn millions of sins, even if your profile is seemingly private. Also, should you pass away in the night, you will be in your grave being punished without the ability to ever take your photos off!
  38. I wish to tell you about my Charity Islamic family website to raise money for needy Muslims here in the USA,Indonesia,Pakistan,Palestine,Iraq,Jordan,and more. It is called muslimtoysanddolls.com and it is spreading the word of Islam through first the children and also secondly the adults.It has over 2000 highly selective items and if you live in the USA it is free shipping and in Canada and if you spend $150 or more free shipping and for our international brothers and sisters we give beautiful silver Allah necklaces both for men and women.I am the official sponsor of the National Eid Toy Drive to help needy children get gifts for the Eid.I have fed over 550 Pakistanis during the floods for two weeks.I help Muslim domestic violence shelters for women and children.I sponsor Muslim educational programs to spread the word of Islam,I have donated over five hundred brand new winter coats from infants to adults and pajamas from children to adults. I have helped a Widowed Somali women with nine children get a sewing machine,notions,fabrics etc.so she can be the seamstress she is to help support her family by giving her a hand up not a hand out and more.if you want to learn more let me know.you can pay with pay pal and you do not even have to be a member.when your ready to pay click on pay pal and they will tell you how to pay with your credit card and i think also you can pay with your bank card. this site has a SSL security certificate so it is a secure site and noone sees your credit or bank card numbers.it cryptograms them as soon as they arrive.Please minfadlik please help us to help others.any purchase no matter how small can help us to help other Muslim brothers and sisters.We are indeed our brothers keepers and should support one another if we are able to.fee aman Allah,JAK and shookrun,thank you from my heart.
  39. Hasham Noormohamed
    February 23, 12:22
    Assalamu aleykum,<br /><br />Nice opinions Masha Allah, however i didnt see anyone commenting on the FACT that PHOTOGRAPHY OF ANIMATE(HUMNAS/ANIMALS) OBJECTS IS HARAAM!!!!!<br />For proof, visit<br />http://www.islamqa.com/en/ref/365/photography
  40. N
    May 16, 22:27
    Great article!!! may Allah reward your efforts and hopefully many females will learn from this :)
  41. abbasm
    May 17, 10:34
    Salam<br />these are some lectures/notes on Face book ethics <br />http://www.islamic-laws.com/facebookethics.htm

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